Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

SISE 2010

A library guide supporting coursework in Introduction to Social Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship

Sciences & Social Science

With some variation among the different disciplines, most scholarly articles of original research follow the IMRD model, which consists of the following components:

Introduction

  • Literature Review
  • Statement of Problem (i.e. "the Gap")
  • Plan to Solve the Problem

Method & Results

  • How Research was Done
  • Data
  • What Answers were Found

Discussion

  • Interpretation of Results
    (What Does It Mean?)
  • Implications for the Field

This form is most obvious in scientific studies, where the methods are clearly defined and described, and data is often presented in tables or graphs for analysis.

In other fields, such as history, the method and results may be embedded in a narrative, perhaps describing and interpreting events from archival sources. In this case, the method is the selection of archival sources and how they were interpreted, while the results are the interpretation and resultant story.

In full-length books, you might see this general pattern followed over the entire book, within each chapter, or both.

Click on the image to explore the typical parts of a scholarly article. Presented by the North Carolina State University Libraries.

Link to interactive tutorial, "Anatomy of a Scholarly Article," presented by the North Carolina State University Libraries

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.